Why Get Involved?

Gardening

Spending time outdoors or gardening has been shown to boost your mood, reduce stress and anxiety, and keep you active. Additionally, gardens can sequester carbon if not dug over and can also provide important wildlife corridors.  Even a patio with a few pots can attract all sorts of insects and birds! 

Below are a few reasons why taking on this new hobby is an important addition to our modern lifestyles.  

Organic Vegetables

Benefit Humans

Community Garden

Benefit Wildlife

Farmer Cutting Cabbage

Benefit the Planet

Organic Vegetables

Benefit Humans

  • It’s good for your mental health  

    • Studies have shown that Mycobacterium vaccae - a harmless bacterium found in the earth – acts as an antidepressant would. Therefore, spending time outside and getting your hands dirty has measurable effects on your wellbeing! 


  • It’s good for your body 

    • We all know this one - eating fruit and vegetables is the best thing you can do for your mind and body! 


  • It gets you out and about

    • You’ll spend more time in the garden! 


  • It connects you to nature and to food 

    • Harvesting a plant you have tended to is very rewarding, and spending time watching it grow, and learning about it can foster a closer relationship with insects and wildlife. It can also make us more sensitive to food waste too, after we realise the effort it takes to grow a bite to eat! 


  • It connects you to others 

    • Growing, harvesting, and eating food, when done together, can create strong bonds, new interests and foster a community feel. Even if you live alone, a trip to the garden centre for some essentials could lead to a coffee morning with a new friend, or a friendly chat with a member of staff!

 
Community Garden

Benefit Wildlife

British gardens cover an estimated 10 million acres, which is more than all of our nature reserves combined. Our little patch of paradise may feel small, but when viewed en mass it becomes part of a huge patchwork of wildlife corridors. 

We hope that over time, your garden may begin to also become a habitat for wildlife, as well as for humans. Please do get in contact if you’d like to learn more about how to do this on a budget. If you are a school or an early years setting, we can direct you to the appropriate funding bodies for such projects.

 
Farmer Cutting Cabbage

Benefit the Planet

If we look after the soil, it will look after us. One of the best things we as gardeners can do is: 

  • Buy peat-free compost.

  • Buy organic if possible and practice organic methods of pest control. 

  • Begin making your own compost.

  • Practice No Dig gardening to sequester carbon, and foster healthy and vibrant soil life to care for your plants: 

    • This simply means not digging over your veg patch, covering bare soil with mulch, and leaving roots in when harvesting.

These are by no means a necessity, but if you are interested in follow Organic, No Dig practices, we are here to support you on your journey. Just get in touch.